• 4-3-20 Issue

    April 2, 2020

    Classrooms Closed for the Rest of the School Year

    March 31, 2020

    Today the

    State Superintendent of Public Instruction Tony Thurmond released information that stated, “Due to the current safety concerns and needs for ongoing social distancing it currently appears that our students will not be able to return to school campuses before the end of the school year. This is in no way to suggest that school is over for the year, but rather we should put all efforts into strengthening our delivery of education through distance learning.” Superintendent Thurmond urged all school districts in California to move towards and/or continue to strengthen distance learning programs and opportunities for students at this time.

    With this new information and an abundance of caution MCOE, school district superintendents, and the charter school directors are taking a safety first approach and immediate action to extend the school facility closures through the end of the school year. To be clear, the 2019-20 school year is not over, it has just transitioned from classroom instruction into distance learning.

    “Distance learning is taking place in different ways throughout our county and we encourage you to contact your students’ teachers and administrators for confirmation of specific plans. Distance learning can look differently for each school and each district, and a student’s ability to learn in an independent study model has to be assessed. We ask for patience and understanding as we are all quickly transitioning into a new way of teaching and learning to meet the health and safety impacts of COVID-19. It’s challenging to many educators and our families to learn and communicate in a very new world but working together we can and will meet this challenge.

    We are also extremely concerned about the social and emotional well-being of all of our students and are working on ways to stay connected even at a distance. We also know that many students, especially our seniors, who we know were looking forward to celebrating promotion and graduation ceremonies are very concerned about missing out on these momentous celebrations. Please know that district leaders will be planning how they might offer these experiences in different formats and/or at a later date. In the coming days and weeks, districts will provide their families with information regarding how grades, graduation, transcripts, scholarships, summer school, and continued distance learning instruction will be handled.

    While we recognize this extension of school facility closures poses challenges and hardship to many families in Monterey County, the most effective way to slow and disrupt the transmission of this pandemic is by continuing to implement social distancing practices. We are grateful to community members throughout Monterey County for their tremendous prevention efforts during this unique and difficult time. “

    Asilomar quarantinees provided transport to their hometown

    March 30, 2020

    We have been advised that people who were quarantined at Asilomar have been provided transport to their respective hometowns as the quarantined is lifted 3/30-4/1

    Traffic Delays for Hwy Curve Warning signs

    March 30, 2020

    A roadside curve warning sign installation project is underway on various highways in Monterey, Santa Cruz and San Benito Counties.

    Roadwork consists of daytime and overnight single lane closures and depending on the highway, sometimes one-way traffic control. Please see breakdown of highways and roadwork hours below.  

    Hwy 1 just north of Carmel Valley Rd to just north of Morrissey Blvd
    Sun-Fri – 9 pm to 5 am
    Hwy 101 just south of Bradley Rd to Jolon Rd
    Mon-Fri – 07:00 am to 4 pm
    Hwy 101 Arroyo Seco Rd to Betabel Rd
    Sun – Mon –10 pm to 6 am (next morning) 
    Mon – Fri –8 pm to 6 am (next morning)
    NB-17 just north of Pasatiempo Dr to just south of Summit Rd

    Mon – Fri—9 pm to 5 am
    SB-17 just north of Pasatiempo Dr to just south of Summit Rd

    Sun – Mon –10 pm to 6 am (next morning)
    Mon – Fri –9 pm to 6 am (next morning)
    Hwy 198 (Hwy-101 to Fresno County line) (Reversible traffic control)
    Hwy 25 (Hwy 198 to Loneoak Rd and Lewis Creek Rd to just south of Tres Pinos) (Reversible traffic control)
    Mon-Fri –8 am to 4 pm
    Hwy 1 just north of Point Sur State Historic Park to Point Lobos (Reversible traffic control)
    Hwy 25 just south of Tres Pinos to just north of Santa Ana Rd (Reversible traffic control)
    Hwy 9 just north of Vernon St to just north of Old Big Trees Rd & just north of Riverdale Blvd to just sout of Hwy-35 (Reversible traffic control)
    Hwy 35 (Mountain Charlie Rd to Black Rd) (Reversible traffic control)
    Mon – Fri – 9 am to 4 pm
    Hwy 68 just north of Scenic Dr to just south of Skyline Forest Dr (Reversible traffic control
    Hwy 9 just north of El Solyo Heights Dr to just south of Irwin Way (Reversible traffic control)
    Hwy 1 From Hwy 156 to just north of Salinas Rd (Reversible traffic control)
    Sun – Fri 9 pm to 6 am (next morning)
    Hwy 146 just west of Stonewall Canyon Rd to just west of West Pinnacles Visitor Station (Reversible traffic control)
    Sun – Mon: 9 pm to 11:59 pm 
    Tue – Fri: 12 midnight to 3 pm
    Hwy 152 Hill Ave to Bella Vista Ln (Reversible traffic control)
    Hwy 129 just east of Murphy Rd to Old Chittenden Rd (Reversible traffic control)
    Hwy 236 Oak Ave to North Escape Rd (Reversible traffic control)
    Sun – Mon: 9 pm to 6 am (next morning); 9 am to 3 pm
    Mon – Fri: 7 pm to 6 am (next morning); 9 am to 3 pm
    Hwy 68 at Portola Drive
    Sun – Fri: 21:00 – 06:00

    NOTE: Roadwork can take place at any location, without order. Currently, the contractor is working on Hwy. 25, switch to Hwy. 198 the second week of April and plans to keep moving. Traffic delays of up to 10 minutes can be expected. Electronic messages will be present to alert motorists of lane closures.

    Quarantine at Asilomar lifted

    March 29, 2020

    The City received notification from a CalOES official the care site at Asilomar is currently in the demobilization process and the CalOES operation has concluded. Starting tomorrow on Monday, March 30th through Wednesday, April 1st, all fencing and logistic items will be removed. If circumstances change, the potential to re-open at a later date will remain a possibility. 
    Mayor Peake will be participating in the City of Monterey Daily Media Briefing tomorrow morning at 11:00 AM. We hope to learn then what will happen to the former passengers of the cruise ship with regard to getting them back to their homes.

    State Officials Announce Latest COVID-19 Facts

    March 28, 2020

    The California Department of Public Health today announced the most recent statistics on COVID-19. California now has 4,643 confirmed cases. For more information on COVID-19 and California’s response visit the California Department of Public Health website.

    COVID-19 in California by the Numbers
    Note:
     The following numbers reflect information received by local health jurisdictions as of 2 p.m. PDT March 27. More current numbers may be available from local health jurisdictions.

    4,643 – Positive cases
    101 – Deaths (including one non-California resident)

    • 923 – Community-acquired cases
    • 3,720 – Cases acquired through person-to-person transmission, travel (including cruise ship passengers), repatriation, or under investigation. This includes 73 health care workers.
      • Ages of all confirmed positive cases:
    • Age 0-17: 54 cases
    • Age 18-49: 2,368 cases
    • Age 50-64: 1,184 cases
    • Age 65+: 1,016 cases
    • Unknown: 21 cases

    Gender of all confirmed positive cases:

    • Female: 2,057 cases
    • Male: 2,536 cases
    • Non-binary: 0 cases
    • Unknown: 50 cases
    • Testing in California
    • As of 2 p.m. PDT on March 27, approximately 89,600 tests had been conducted in California. This includes the latest numbers California has received from commercial and private labs and the 22 state and county health labs that are currently testing. Commercial, provider and academic labs have increased testing capacity and are now reporting that data to the state. The biggest labs included in this count include Quest, LabCorp, Kaiser, University of California and Stanford.

    At least 25,192 results have been received and another 64,400 are pending.

    How People Can Protect Themselves
    Every person has a role to play. Protecting yourself and your family comes down to common sense: 

    • Staying home except for essential needs/activities.
    • Practicing social distancing.
    • Washing hands with soap and water for a minimum of 20 seconds.
    • Avoiding touching eyes, nose or mouth with unwashed hands.
    • Covering a cough or sneeze with your sleeve, or disposable tissue. Wash your hands afterward.
    • Avoiding close contact with people who are sick.
    • Staying away from work, school or other people if you become sick with respiratory symptoms like fever and cough.
    • Following guidance from public health officials.

    What to Do if You Think You’re Sick
    Call ahead: If you are experiencing symptoms of COVID-19 (fever, cough or shortness of breath) and may have had contact with a person with COVID-19, or recently traveled to countries with apparent community spread, call your health care provider before seeking medical care so that appropriate precautions can be taken.

    More information about what Californians can do to prevent the spread of COVID-19 is available atwww.covid19.ca.gov.

    California continues to issue guidance on preparing and protecting California from COVID-19. Consolidated guidance is available at www.cdph.ca.gov/covid19guidance.

    MST SERVICE SUSPENSION DURING CORONAVIRUS (COVID-19) PANDEMIC

    March 26, 2020

    EFFECTIVE MARCH 28, 2020 

    MST understands that many residents rely on our services to access essential services and employment. MST has always prided itself in providing the communities we serve with safe, reliable, efficient transportation; however, at this time, we will reduce frequency, and in some cases, suspend service on certain lines.

    The County of Monterey has issued a shelter in place emergency order, and although MST is considered an essential business and service will continue, it will be in a limited capacity.

    MST will operate on weekdays as if it were a modified Sunday schedule throughout the week with the following exceptions:

    Lines already suspended until further notice:

    47  Hartnell – Alisal Campus

    55  Monterey – San Jose Express

    70  Presidio – La Mesa

    72  Presidio – North Salinas

    74  Presidio – Toro Park

    75  Presidio – Marshall Park

    76  Presidio – Stillwell Park

    78  Presidio – Santa Cruz

    86  King City – San Jose/San Jose Airport

    MST Trolley

    Lines which are suspended until further notice effective March 28: 

    4    Carmel – Carmel Rancho

    8    Ryan Ranch – Sand City

    12  The Dunes – NPS

    14  La Mesa – NPS

    19  Del Monte Center – CSUMB via East Campus

    25  CSUMB – Salinas70   Presidio – La Mesa

    26  CSUMB – East Campus Express

    27  Watsonville – Marina

    46  Natividad – Salinas

    48  Salinas – Salinas Airport Business Center

    56  Salinas – Monterey

    Del Rey Oaks Special Service

    Lines which will continue to operate weekday schedules:

    Line 93 Ryan Ranch – Monterey

    South County On Call in Gonzales, Greenfield, King City and Soledad

    All other lines below will operate as if it were a modified Sunday schedule throughout the week and on weekends. Please note increased service to CHOMP on Lines 22 and 24. Passengers should reference the Sunday timetable on the day they ride. 

    JAZZ A Aquarium – Sand City

    JAZZ B Aquarium – Sand City

    1    Asilomar – Monterey

    2    Pacific Grove – Carmel

    3    CHOMP – Monterey

    7    Del Rey Oaks – Monterey (operates weekends only)

    11  Carmel – Sand City

    16  Marina – CSUMB

    18  Monterey – Marina

    20  Salinas – Monterey

    21  Pebble Beach – Salinas Express

    22  Big Sur – Monterey (operates three round trips and now serves CHOMP)

    23  Salinas – King City

    24  Monterey – Carmel Valley Grapevine Express (now serves CHOMP)

    28  Watsonville – Salinas via Castroville

    29  Watsonville – Salinas via Prunedale

    40  Spreckels – Alisal (operates weekends only)                                                                           

    41  Northridge – Salinas via East Alisal  

    42  Westridge – Alisal (operates weekends only)

    44  Northridge – Salinas via Westridge

    45  Northridge – Salinas via East Market

    49  Salinas – Santa Rita via Northridge

    61  Salinas – VA-DOD Clinic

    82  Fort Hunter Liggett – Salinas Express

    84  King City – Paso Robles

    85  Fort Hunter Liggett – Templeton

    91  Sand City – Pacific Meadows

    92  CHOMP – Pacific Meadows

    94  Sandy City – Carmel

    95  Williams Ranch – Northridge

    Marina OnCall

    MST staff is committed to providing service to passengers, and staying healthy ourselves in order to perform our jobs well. We will continue to take precautions to protect employees and customers from the novel Coronavirus (COVID-19), and ask our passengers to do the same. Please follow CDC recommended guidelines: wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds, use antibacterial hand sanitizer, and if your trip is not essential, please stay home. Let’s all do our part to keep everyone healthy.

    For more information, visit mst.org or call 1-888-MST-BUS1 (1-888-678-2871) toll free. For RealTime bus arrival information, text “Next” and your four-digit bus stop ID (example, “Next 9103”) to 25370, call 1-888-MST-BUS1 with your four-digit bus stop ID, download the free Transit app, or use Google Maps. Follow twitter.com/mst_bus for the latest service alerts.

    3-27-20 Issue

    March 26, 2020

    Rain Gauge as of 11:35AM 3/23/20

    March 25, 2020

    Pacific Grove, beyond FOREST HILL SHOPPING and below Holman Hwy. 

    Data reported by Bruce & Judy Cowan, residents. 

    Week Ending Wednesday, March 25, 2020

          Inches, as of 11 AM, 3/25/20:                2.0″            

     Current season’s total since 7/1/19:             17.77″  

    Rain total one year ago to date:                 22.85″

    _______________________________________________

    Previous Season– July 2018 through June 2019:      26″  

    COVID 19 Update 3/23/10

    March 24, 2020

    State Officials Announce Latest COVID-19 Facts

    The California Department of Public Health announced the most recent statistics on COVID-19. California now has 2,102 confirmed cases. For more information on COVID-19 and California’s response visit the California Department of Public Health website.


    COVID-19 in California by the Numbers

    Note: The following numbers reflect information received by local health jurisdictions as of 2 p.m. PDT March 23. More current numbers may be available from local health jurisdictions.

    2,102 – Positive cases

    40 – Deaths (including one non-California resident)

    *Increase occurred over period of two days.

    • 531 – Community-acquired cases
    • 1,571 – Cases acquired through person-to-person transmission, travel (including cruise ship passengers), repatriation, or under investigation.

    o   This includes 31 health care workers.

    Ages of all confirmed positive cases:

    ·         Age 0-17: 28 cases

    ·         Age 18-49: 970 cases

    ·         Age 50-64: 493 cases

    ·         Age 65+: 449 cases

    ·         Unknown: 162 cases

    Gender of all confirmed positive cases:

    ·         Female: 843 cases

    ·         Male: 1,081 cases

    ·         Unknown: 178 cases

    22 – State and county health labs currently testing

    In order to better focus public health resources on the changing needs of California communities, on March 18, the state is no longer collecting information about California travelers returning from countries that have confirmed COVID-19 outbreaks. Community transmission of COVID-19 has been identified in California since late February, and since early March, most of the confirmed cases in the state were not related to travel outside of the United States.


    Testing in California

    As of 2 p.m. PDT on March 23, approximately 27,650 tests had been conducted in California. This includes the latest numbers California has received from commercial and private labs. At least 15,554 results have been received and another 12,100 are pending. 

    How People Can Protect Themselves
    Every person has a role to play. Protecting yourself and your family comes down to common sense: 

    ·         Staying home except for essential needs/activities.

    ·         Practicing social distancing.

    ·         Washing hands with soap and water for a minimum of 20 seconds.

    ·         Avoiding touching eyes, nose or mouth with unwashed hands.

    ·         Covering a cough or sneeze with your sleeve, or disposable tissue. Wash your hands afterward.

    ·         Avoiding close contact with people who are sick.

    ·         Staying away from work, school or other people if you become sick with respiratory symptoms like fever and cough.

    ·         Following guidance from public health officials.

    What to Do if You Think You’re Sick
    Call ahead: If you are experiencing symptoms of COVID-19 (fever, cough or shortness of breath) and may have had contact with a person with COVID-19, or recently traveled to countries with apparent community spread, call your health care provider before seeking medical care so that appropriate precautions can be taken.

    More information about what Californians can do to prevent the spread of COVID-19 is available atwww.covid19.ca.gov.

    California continues to issue guidance on preparing and protecting California from COVID-19. Consolidated guidance is available at www.cdph.ca.gov/covid19guidance.

    www.cdph.ca.gov

    State Officials Announce Latest COVID-19 Facts

    March 23, 2020

    Monday March 23

    The California Department of Public Health today announced the most recent statistics on COVID-19. California now has 1,733 confirmed cases. For more information on COVID-19 and California’s response visit the California Department of Public Health website.
    COVID-19 in California by the Numbers
    Note: The following numbers reflect information received by local health jurisdictions as of 2 p.m. PDT March 22. More current numbers may be available from local health jurisdictions.

    1,733 – Positive cases

    27 – Deaths (including one non-California resident)

    Ages of all confirmed positive cases:

    ·                     Age 0-17: 25 cases

    ·                     Age 18-49: 837 cases

    ·                     Age 50-64: 442 cases

    ·                     Age 65+: 415 cases

    ·                     Unknown: 14 cases

    1,709 – Cases not related to repatriation flights

    ·                     120– Travel-related

    ·                     165 – Person to person

    ·                     474– Community transmission

    ·                     950 – Under investigation

    24 – Cases of positive tests related to federal repatriation flights

    22 – State and county health labs currently testing

    In order to better focus public health resources on the changing needs of California communities, on March 18, the state is no longer collecting information about California travelers returning from countries that have confirmed COVID-19 outbreaks. Community transmission of COVID-19 has been identified in California since late February, and since early March, most of the confirmed cases in the state were not related to travel outside of the United States.


    Testing in California

    As of 2 p.m. PDT on March 22, approximately 26,400 tests had been conducted in California. This includes the latest numbers California has received from commercial and private labs. At least 14,317 results have been received and another 12,100 are pending. 

    How People Can Protect Themselves
    Every person has a role to play. Protecting yourself and your family comes down to common sense: 

    ·                     Stay at home except for essential needs/activities.

    ·                     Washing hands with soap and water for a minimum of 20 seconds.

    ·                     Avoiding touching eyes, nose or mouth with unwashed hands.

    ·                     Cover a cough or sneeze with your sleeve, or disposable tissue. Wash your hands afterward.

    ·                     Avoiding close contact with people who are sick.

    ·                     Staying away from work, school or other people if you become sick with respiratory symptoms like fever and cough.

    ·                     Practice social distancing.

    ·                     Following guidance from public health officials.

    What to Do if You Think You’re Sick
    Call ahead: If you are experiencing symptoms of COVID-19 (fever, cough or shortness of breath) and may have had contact with a person with COVID-19, or recently traveled to countries with apparent community spread, call your health care provider before seeking medical care so that appropriate precautions can be taken.

    California continues to issue guidance on preparing and protecting California from COVID-19. Consolidated guidance is available at www.cdph.ca.gov/covid19guidance.

    www.cdph.ca.gov

    State Officials Announce Latest COVID-19 Facts

    March 22, 2020

    Community Hospital of the Monterey Peninsula has reported one positive test for Coronavirus.

    The patient is a Monterey Peninsula resident. As of Saturday afternoon, the health department reported 11 confirmed cases among Monterey County residents.

    “Our first case, of course, wasn’t a surprise,” said Dr. Steven Packer, Montage Health president/CEO. “We have been anticipating the inevitable arrival of COVID-19 cases for some time. While this is our first case, it certainly won’t be the last.”

    The patient came to the Community Hospital Emergency Department and was seen in the adjacent triage tent. The patient was immediately isolated, and recommended for testing, following the hospital-established protocol designed to protect our patients, staff, and community. “The way our staff prepared and assessed the patient was exactly how we had planned,” Packer said. “It was the most controlled environment possible.”

    The patient did not require hospitalization and was sent home with care instructions and is now in self-quarantine. Monterey County Health Department will determine whether this case was community-acquired, related to travel, or acquired from direct contact with a known case.

    Community Hospital has sent 75 cases to the county for COVID-testing, with 59 of those coming back with negative results, 15 results are pending.

    For more information about our COVID-19 response, support, visitor policies, and more, please visit www.chomp.org. Montage Health, Community Hospital’s parent company is offering free virtual care visits for those who suspect they have COVID-19 or have other respiratory symptoms. Visit evisit.montagehealth.org. Community Hospital also has a COVID-19 information line. Community members can call (831) 622-8001.

    California now has 1,468 confirmed cases.

    For more information on COVID-19 and California’s response visit the California Department of Public Health website.

    Note: The following numbers reflect information received from local health jurisdictions as of 2 p.m. PDT March 21. More current numbers may be available from local health jurisdictions.

    1,468 – Positive cases

    27 – Deaths (including one non-California resident)

    Ages of all confirmed positive cases: 1,468

    • Age 0-17: 23 cases
    • Age 18-64: 1066 cases
    • Age 65+: 369 cases
    • Unknown: 10 cases

    Cases not related to repatriation flights: 1,444

    • 113 – Travel-related
    • 145 – Person to person
    • 408 – Community transmission
    • 778 – Under investigation

    24 – Positive cases related to federal repatriation flights

    Testing in California

    As of 2 p.m. PDT March 21, approximately 26,200 tests had been conducted in California. This includes the latest numbers California has received from commercial and private labs. At least 13,467 results have been received and another 12,700+ are pending. Twenty-two state and county health labsare currently testing.

    In order to better focus public health resources on the changing needs of California communities, the state is no longer collecting information about California travelers returning from countries that have confirmed COVID-19 outbreaks. Community transmission of COVID-19 has been identified in California since late February, and since early March, most of the confirmed cases in the state were not related to travel outside of the United States.


    How People Can Protect Themselves

    Every person has a role to play. Protecting yourself and your family comes down to common sense: 

    ·                     Staying home except for essential activities.

    ·                     Washing hands with soap and water for a minimum of 20 seconds.

    ·                     Avoiding touching eyes, nose or mouth with unwashed hands.

    ·                     Cover a cough or sneeze with your sleeve, or disposable tissue. Wash your hands afterward.

    ·                     Avoiding close contact with people who are sick.

    ·                     Staying away from work, school or other people if you become sick with respiratory symptoms like fever and cough.

    ·                     Practicing social distancing.

    ·                     Following guidance from public health officials.

    What to Do if You Think You’re Sick
    Call ahead: If you are experiencing symptoms of COVID-19 (fever, cough or shortness of breath) and may have had contact with a person with COVID-19, or recently traveled to countries with apparent community spread, call your health care provider before seeking medical care so that appropriate precautions can be taken.

    California continues to issue guidance on preparing and protecting California from COVID-19. Consolidated guidance is available at www.cdph.ca.gov/covid19guidance.

    More information about what Californians can do to prevent the spread of COVID-19 is available at www.covid19.ca.gov.

    www.cdph.ca.gov

    State Officials Announce Latest COVID-19 Facts

    March 21, 2020

    The California Department of Public Health today announced the most recent statistics on COVID-19. California now has 1,006 confirmed cases. For more information on COVID-19 and California’s response visit the California Department of Public Health website.


    COVID-19 in California by the Numbers

    Note: The following numbers reflect information received by local health jurisdictions as of 6 p.m. PDT March 19. More current numbers may be available from local health jurisdictions.

    1,006 – Positive cases

    19 – Deaths (including one non-California resident)

    Ages of all confirmed positive cases:

    ·                     Age 0-17: 18 cases

    ·                     Age 18-64: 711 cases

    ·                     Age 65+: 273 cases

    ·                     Unknown: 4 cases

    982 – Cases not related to repatriation flights

    ·                     86– Travel-related

    ·                     108 – Person to person

    ·                     266 – Community transmission

    ·                     522 – Under investigation

    24 – Cases of positive tests related to federal repatriation flights

    22 – State and county health labs currently testing

    In order to better focus public health resources on the changing needs of California communities, on March 18, the state is no longer collecting information about California travelers returning from countries that have confirmed COVID-19 outbreaks. Community transmission of COVID-19 has been identified in California since late February, and since early March, most of the confirmed cases in the state were not related to travel outside of the United States.


    Testing in California

    As of 6 p.m. PDT on March 19, approximately 23,200 tests had been conducted in California. This includes the latest numbers California has received from commercial and private labs. At least 11,487 results have been received and another 11,700+ are pending. 

    How People Can Protect Themselves
    Every person has a role to play. Protecting yourself and your family comes down to common sense: 

    ·                     Staying home except for essential activities.

    ·                     Washing hands with soap and water for a minimum of 20 seconds.

    ·                     Avoiding touching eyes, nose or mouth with unwashed hands.

    ·                     Cover a cough or sneeze with your sleeve, or disposable tissue. Wash your hands afterward.

    ·                     Avoiding close contact with people who are sick.

    ·                     Staying away from work, school or other people if you become sick with respiratory symptoms like fever and cough.

    ·                     Practice social distancing.

    ·                     Following guidance from public health officials.

    What to Do if You Think You’re Sick
    Call ahead: If you are experiencing symptoms of COVID-19 (fever, cough or shortness of breath) and may have had contact with a person with COVID-19, or recently traveled to countries with apparent community spread, call your health care provider before seeking medical care so that appropriate precautions can be taken.

    California continues to issue guidance on preparing and protecting California from COVID-19. Consolidated guidance is available at www.cdph.ca.gov/covid19guidance.

    State Officials Announce Latest COVID-19 Facts

    March 20, 2020

    The California Department of Public Health today announced the most recent statistics on COVID-19. California now has 1,006 confirmed cases. For more information on COVID-19 and California’s response visit the California Department of Public Health website.


    COVID-19 in California by the Numbers

    Note: The following numbers reflect information received by local health jurisdictions as of 6 p.m. PDT March 19. More current numbers may be available from local health jurisdictions.

    1,006 – Positive cases

    19 – Deaths (including one non-California resident)

    Ages of all confirmed positive cases:

    ·                     Age 0-17: 18 cases

    ·                     Age 18-64: 711 cases

    ·                     Age 65+: 273 cases

    ·                     Unknown: 4 cases

    982 – Cases not related to repatriation flights

    ·                     86– Travel-related

    ·                     108 – Person to person

    ·                     266 – Community transmission

    ·                     522 – Under investigation

    24 – Cases of positive tests related to federal repatriation flights

    22 – State and county health labs currently testing

    In order to better focus public health resources on the changing needs of California communities, on March 18, the state is no longer collecting information about California travelers returning from countries that have confirmed COVID-19 outbreaks. Community transmission of COVID-19 has been identified in California since late February, and since early March, most of the confirmed cases in the state were not related to travel outside of the United States.


    Testing in California

    As of 6 p.m. PDT on March 19, approximately 23,200 tests had been conducted in California. This includes the latest numbers California has received from commercial and private labs. At least 11,487 results have been received and another 11,700+ are pending. 

    How People Can Protect Themselves
    Every person has a role to play. Protecting yourself and your family comes down to common sense: 

    ·                     Staying home except for essential activities.

    ·                     Washing hands with soap and water for a minimum of 20 seconds.

    ·                     Avoiding touching eyes, nose or mouth with unwashed hands.

    ·                     Cover a cough or sneeze with your sleeve, or disposable tissue. Wash your hands afterward.

    ·                     Avoiding close contact with people who are sick.

    ·                     Staying away from work, school or other people if you become sick with respiratory symptoms like fever and cough.

    ·                     Practice social distancing.

    ·                     Following guidance from public health officials.

    What to Do if You Think You’re Sick
    Call ahead: If you are experiencing symptoms of COVID-19 (fever, cough or shortness of breath) and may have had contact with a person with COVID-19, or recently traveled to countries with apparent community spread, call your health care provider before seeking medical care so that appropriate precautions can be taken.

    California continues to issue guidance on preparing and protecting California from COVID-19. Consolidated guidance is available at www.cdph.ca.gov/covid19guidance.

    www.cdph.ca.gov

    3-20-20 Issue

    March 19, 2020

    LOCAL RESTAURANTS LIMIT TO TAKE-OUT ONLY, NO SEATING

    March 18, 2020

    Social distancing requirements

    March 18, 2020

    Officials Announce Latest COVID-19 Facts

    California Department of Public Health announced the most recent statistics on COVID-19. California now has 598 confirmed cases.

    For more information on COVID-19 and California’s response visit the California Department of Public Health’s website.
    COVID-19 in California by the Numbers (as of 6 p.m. Pacific Daylight Time on March 17, 2020):

    13 – Deaths (including one non-California resident)

    598 – Positive cases

    Ages of all confirmed positive cases:

    • Age 0-17:  13 cases
    • Age 18-64: 392 cases
    • Age 65+: 188 cases
    • Unknown: 5 cases

    24 – Cases of positive tests related to federal repatriation flights

    574 – Cases not related to repatriation flights

    • 91– Travel-related
    • 88 – Person to person
    • 142 – Community transmission
    • 253 – Under investigation

    11,900+ – Number of people self-monitoring who returned to the U.S. through SFO or LAX
    49 – Number of local health jurisdictions involved in self-monitoring
    22 – Labs with test kits, 21 of which are already testing

    How Can People Protect Themselves
    Every person has a role to play. Protecting yourself and your family comes down to common sense: 

    • Washing hands with soap and water for a minimum of 20 seconds.
    • Avoiding touching eyes, nose or mouth with unwashed hands.
    • Cover a cough or sneeze with your sleeve, or disposable tissue. Wash your hands afterward.
    • Avoiding close contact with people who are sick.
    • Staying away from work, school or other people if you become sick with respiratory symptoms like fever and cough.
    • Practice social distancing.
    • Following guidance from public health officials.

    What to Do if You Think You’re Sick:
    Call ahead: If you are experiencing symptoms of COVID-19 and may have had contact with a person with COVID-19, or recently traveled to countries with apparent community spread, call your health care provider before seeking medical care so that appropriate precautions can be taken.

    California continues to issue guidance on preparing and protecting California from COVID-19. Consolidated guidance is available on California Department of Public Health’s Guidance page.

    Forest Grove Students Extend Welcome to Quarantined Passengers

    March 17, 2020

    Schools to close Mon., March 16 through Tues., March 31

    March 13, 2020

    The following message is being sent on behalf of all school districts in Monterey County and the Monterey County Office of Education

    March 13, 2020

    Monterey County School Communities,

    The safety and well-being of students, families, and school personnel are the highest priorities of all Monterey County schools, districts, and programs serving our infants, children, youth and young adults. Our school communities have been following guidance and directives from the local, state and national health departments.

    Our state and local health and government entities have expressed the need to increase our preventative measures to reduce the spread of novel coronavirus (COVID-19) and the various ways we as communities can work together to do so. There are no confirmed cases in Monterey County as of today, March 13, 2020, but in an abundance of caution and after long and careful deliberation, the Monterey County Office of Education and Monterey County School District Superintendents in conjunction with the Monterey County Health Department have decided to close all public schools and extracurricular programs in Monterey County schools for the remainder of March. Schools will be closed for students starting Monday, March 16 through Tuesday, March 31. Each district will communicate to their families regarding extending closure dates past March 31.

    Our school staffs will work together during this time to prepare and explore options of alternate education methods. We also will work to ensure that throughout the closure, districts provide the vital services and resources our schools offer to our community, including, but not limited to, free and reduced meal programs. Schools will be contacting families in the coming days about services available to them throughout the closure.

    Schools are an essential service and crucial to our communities. We are facing an unprecedented health crisis in our community, and new information is surfacing rapidly. It is probable our community will see cases of COVID-19 in the coming weeks and months and this will require a measured, sustained response.

    While we recognize this decision may pose challenges and hardship to many families in Monterey County, the most effective way to slow and disrupt the transmission of this pandemic is by implementing social distancing practices. In order for these preventative measures to be effective, students should stay home and minimize social contact as much as possible to keep caregivers and adult family members safe. Children have not been shown to be a high-risk group for serious illness from this virus. However, they can transmit the virus to those most vulnerable. Public health officials recommend that families make arrangements for childcare during closure that avoid leaving children with elderly or those with compromised immune systems, those who are more vulnerable to the impact of the virus.

    We know this decision creates a number of pressing questions and concerns. More detailed information will be shared as soon as possible about this unique situation, how employees will be impacted, and how families can support student learning during school closures. As a priority, we are working to provide nutrition services to all families in alternative formats.

    As parents and caregivers, you are your child’s first teacher, and you are your child’s most influential teacher. Ongoing developments regarding COVID-19 may be overwhelming, especially to younger children. Parents and community members can help children and youth understand the situation better by discussing their specific questions and concerns. Resources for how to talk to children and youth about COVID-19 will be shared in future communications.

    This is a dynamic situation where information and circumstances can evolve quickly. For the latest updates, visit the California Public Health Department’s 2019 novel coronavirus website at: https://www.cdph.ca.gov/Programs/CID/ DCDC/Pages/Immunization/ncov2019 and for local health updates visit the Monterey County Health Department’s 2019 novel coronavirus website at: https://www.co.monterey.ca.us/government/departments-a-h/health/ diseases/2019-novel-coronavirus-2019-ncov. The Monterey County Office of Education also provides school-related updates on its COVID-19 webpage at: https://www.montereycoe.org/resources/alerts/coronavirus/.

    We also understand that implementing these changes with such limited notice is challenging and disruptive, and we appreciate your patience and cooperation. We are grateful to community members throughout Monterey County for their tremendous prevention efforts during these challenging times.

    Sincerely,
    Dr. Deneen Guss, Monterey County Superintendent of Schools Jim Koenig, Alisal Union School District
    Jonathan Sison, Big Sur Unified School District Ian Trejo, Bradley Union School District
    Dr. Barbara Dill-Varga, Carmel Unified School District Roberto Rios, Chualar Union School District
    Dr. Yvette Irving, Gonzales Unified School District Rosemarie Grounds, Graves School District Zandra Jo Galvan, Greenfield Union School District Rory Livingston, King City Union School District Daniel Stonebloom, Lagunita School District
    Dr. Jinane Annous, Mission Union School District
    Dr. PK Diffenbaugh, Monterey Peninsula Unified School District Kari Yeater, North Monterey County Unified School District
    Dr. Ralph Gómez Porras, Pacific Grove Unified School District Martha L. Martinez, Salinas City Elementary School District Dan Burns, Salinas Union High School District
    Josh Van Norman, San Antonio Union School District Dr. Catherine Reimer, San Ardo Union School District Jessica Riley, San Lucas Union School District
    Tim Ryan, Santa Rita Union School District Tim Vanoli, Soledad Unified School District
    Dr. Brian Walker, South Monterey County Joint Union High School District Eric Tarallo, Spreckels Union School District
    Gina Uccelli, Washington Union School District

    **************************************************************************

    Asilomar: Refuge by the Sea

    March 12, 2020

    By Al Saxe


    While the Sanctuary cities of San Francisco and Oakland had no room at the Inn for the passengers aboard the Princess Cruise Ship docked at the Port of Oakland, the city of Pacific Grove did!

    The selection of Asilomar and Pacific Grove was an interesting choice to say the least. The Asilomar neighborhood has the demographics most attractive to the virus. The senior laden area has many elders with severe respiratory and heart problems and a significant population above sixty years of age.
    If as expected all the quarantined passengers successfully clear quarantine and return to their homes the rationale of selecting Asilomar will probably not be delved into. However If something does go amiss Katie bar the door!
    There is no doubt that the quarantined passengers will be more likely to find their peace here than on a military base in the desert. In fact I would not be surprised if some of them will become smitten with our area and return to visit often or even buy a home here. Even the Incident Commander was enthralled with Asilomar saying “You live in such a beautiful area.” There is also no doubt that the school children of Pacific Grove will send letters or cards filled with compassion and love to the guests. Pacific Grove students always amaze me with their kindness.
    As usual the Salvation Army will be there when needed. They will prepare 100 meals off site three times a day for the repatriated cruise ship passengers and the staff sent here to care for them. The meal service will begin March 11th and will run until March 27th.The meals will be delivered to a safe area nearby where the medical staff will receive them and bring them to the quarantined guests. I have been told No Asilomar conference Center employees will be in contact with those “serving their time.” However one does wonder who will clean the buildings and restrooms during and after the operation and remove the trash. As far as security is concerned, as of Tuesday only yellow police tape provided a barrier to an accidental intrusion of the quarantined area. This so called barrier did not deter our beloved deer who gracefully navigated through it like it was a ticker tape parade in their honor. There was talk of putting up fencing around the area after the quests arrived. Hopefully someone in Sacramento won’t want a wall or guard tower. If they do I am sure the coastal commission will intervene.
    The uncertainty and uneasiness of our guests will hopefully be lessened by the understanding and friendliness of the people of our town. It was an eerie sight driving by the quarantined area late Tues night. An excessive number of floodlights lit up the night time sky and medical personnel as they carefully unloaded the weary passengers from numerous ambulances. Once again we are reminded of the compassion and valor of our first responders.

    3-13-20 Issue

    March 12, 2020

    Corona Virus Refugees Housed in Pacific Grove

    March 10, 2020

    The State of California OES and the governor have been working to secure hotels and motels for a grand potential of more than 2461 passengers and crew, ever since they learned last week that the Princess Cruise ocean liner, on it way back to the United States, carried potential patients of the coronavirus. 19 crew members and two passengers have tested positive for the virus from another group of people on the ship, so the steps were taken out of an abundance of caution, according to reports.

    Up to 24 passengers, according to Cal OES, are being relocated to Pacific Grove where they will be housed at the Asilomar State Beach and Conference Grounds,. They will be removed from other visitors and the public and will not interact with other Asilomar guests, employees, or the general public. Reliable sources say that the Salvation Army will undertake to feed the refugees.

    In a press release, it was stated that “All the individuals have been screened by medical professionals. While none of these individuals is known to have contracted novel coronavirus (COVID 19), they will be tested and monitored by medical professionals while at Asilomar.”

    Governor Newsom earlier in the day pointed out that the potential patients will be moved to multiple locations. They have been moved from Travis Air Force Base precisely because they do not have serious symptoms requiring hospitalization.

    The City of Pacific Grove was not involved in the decision to quarantine individuals at Asilomar.  However, the City has been coordinating with state and county health and emergency officials. 

    “The safety and well being of our residents are paramount. ” said Mayor Bill Peake.  “We understand that cruise ship passengers were pre-screened at Bay Area hospitals. ”  

    More information and precautions to prevent its spread can be found at cdc.gov and caloes.ca.gov.  We will provide additional information as it becomes available.

    A large number of Pacific Grove residents are in the high risk group of people over the age of 60.

    Updates will be posted online, on Facebook, and Twitter as they become available.

    3-6-20 Issue

    March 5, 2020

    And…, They’re Off!

    March 5, 2020

     Track & Field / Wayne Guffin 

    The Breakers opened their 2020 Track season on Leap Day at the inaugural Bellarmine Invitational in San Jose. Unfortunately, due to last minute complications this reporter was unable to attend, so all I know is what’s in the meet results. A quick run-down: 

    The foursome of Devean Batres, Anthony da Silva, Ray Birkett, and Delson Hayes finished 2nd in the 4×100 Meter Relay with a respectable early season time of 48.19. 

    Read the rest of this story »

    PGHS Baseball Season Kicks Off

    March 5, 2020

    Moore & Wood lead PG to a 7-6 squeaker over Soledad in opening game.

    by Brian Wood (Woodie)

    Pacific Grove opened its 2020 baseball season at home Wednesday holding off a persistent Soledad team in a 7-6 victory. Sophomore starting pitcher Brenden Moore led the way hurling two strong innings, allowing no hits while striking out five. In fact, the Aztec bats only touched the ball five times, once to the second baseman and four foul balls. Moore went two for two at the plate hitting two long doubles, driving in a pair, and scoring twice. 

    Read the rest of this story »

    2-28-20 Issue

    February 27, 2020

    City Council Actions Feb. 19, 2020

    February 26, 2020

    Received a presentation from Community Human Services Chief Executive Officer Robin McCrae and Development Director Rob Rapp and Pacific Grove Representative Alan Cohen regarding the Casa de Noche Buena project.Received a presentation from Office of Emergency Services Kelsey Scanlon regarding Multi-Jurisdictional Hazard Mitigation Plan.Approved the minutes of the February 5, 2020 City Council Special and Regular Meeting.Approved a resolution authorizing the City Manager to execute a memorandum of understanding with the County of Monterey for tobacco retail licensing and administration and enforcement service.Held second reading and adopted an ordinance to amend PGMC Title 3, Boards and Commissions, pertaining to the Museum Board and the Point Pinos Lighthouse, and direct a summary of the ordinance be published as approved by the City Attorney.Held a second reading and adopted an ordinance amending PGMC 14-08 (E-Bikes).Received the Treasurer’s Quarterly Report – Second Quarter, Fiscal Year 19-20.Received the Quarterly Budget Report – Second Quarter, Fiscal Year 19-20.Received the Workers Compensation Report – Second Quarter Fiscal Year 2019-20.Received the City Council Goals update.Received the Mayor’s Regional Meetings.Received the MST Highlights for February 10, 2020.Authorized the City Manager to enter into an agreement with C&N Tractors for the purchase of a Kubota L47 tractor in an amount not to exceed $44,176.Approved appointments to Administrative Enforcement Hearing Officer Panel and Library Board.Received minutes from the Museum Board and Recreation Board.Introduced and held the first reading to amend Pacific Grove Municipal Code 11.96 Unlawful Noises (Leaf Blowers), and direct publication of a summary as directed by the City Attorney.Received the FY 19/20 Capital Improvement Plan (CIP) mid-year progress update and amended the FY 19/20 CIP Project List.Approved the Memorandum of Understanding between the City of Pacific Grove and the General Employees Association.Adopted a resolution in support of the Be SMART educational campaign on responsible firearm storage.The agenda reports and supporting documents for all of these actions are on the City’s website, at http://www.cityofpacificgrove.org/about-city/city-council.  Details of the actions taken will also be available, upon completion and adoption of the meeting minutes, which will also be posted on the website.
    The next Regular City Council Meeting is scheduled for March 4, 2020.

    MONARCH Act introduced

    February 20, 2020

    Webster Slate, Jimmy Panetta, and Robert Pacelli

    Efforts to save the endangered species by Congressman Panetta

    Congressman Panetta Unveils MONARCH Act to Prevent the Extinction of Western Monarch Butterflies

    On Thursday, February 20, 2020, Congressman Jimmy Panetta (D-Carmel Valley) unveiled the  bipartisan, bicameral Monarch Action, Recovery, and Conservation of Habitat (MONARCH) Act  to help prevent the extinction of western monarch butterflies. He was joined by Pacific Grove Mayor Bill Peake.

    This bipartisan, bicameral legislation will provide urgent protections for the struggling western monarch butterfly, a pollinator that is integral to supporting American agriculture and whose population has dropped by 99% since the 1980s.

    “Our district on the central coast of California is home to four of the top 10 high priority overwintering sites for western monarch butterflies. Sadly, as climate change continues to degrade their habitat, we have seen a huge decline in the number of monarchs on the Central Coast and along their migratory path,”  said Congressman Panetta.  “The MONARCH Act will provide critical federal investment in the activities needed to save the western monarch butterfly population from extinction. By actively restoring and protecting key monarch habitats, we can also help facilitate the conservation of other essential pollinators.”

    “You could say that Monarch Butterflies are part of the community’s DNA. We’ve long recognized Monarchs as key species to be celebrated and preserved. Our school district’s annual Butterfly Parade started 80 years ago. The City’s official logo and signs includes a Monarch. Importantly, the community recognized the need to conserve Monarch habitat by purchasing land for the Monarch Butterfly Sanctuary. But we can’t do it alone and applaud efforts by Congressman Panetta to encourage others to join us so that Monarchs thrive well into the future,”said Mayor Peake

    “This bill could provide Pacific Grove with the much-needed resources to make significant improvements to monarch habitat,”  said Caleb Schneider, Management Analyst, City of Pacific Grove Public Works.

    2-21-20 Issue

    February 20, 2020

    2-14-20 Issue

    February 13, 2020

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  • Beach Report Card

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    This is the Heal the Bay Beach Report Card for Monterey Peninsula beaches, which reports water quality grades, or when relevant, weather advisories. An A to F grade is assigned based on the health risks of swimming or surfing at that location. Look at the "dry" grade for all days except those "wet" days during and within 3 days after a rainstorm. Click here for more information on the Beach Report Card. Click the name of the beach when it pops up for more details, or choose a beach below.

    AsilomarCarmelLovers PointMunicipal Wharf 2 (Monterey)Upper Del Monte Beach (Monterey)San Carlos Beach (Cannery Row)Stillwater Cove (Pebble Beach)Spanish Bay

    adapted from Heal the Bay, brc.healthebay.org
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